Category Archive : 1 Day Tours

Athens City Sightseeing Tour with Acropolis and the New Acropolis Museum
Daily 08:45 – 13:00
A comprehensive tour of Athens. Drive through the centre of Athens, past the Academy, the University and the Parliament with the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, and see Hadrian’s Arch and the stadium where the first modern Olympics took place in 1896. Continue to the Acropolis for a visit to the ancient hilltop complex that was once the Cradle of Western civilization and today overlooks the sprawling city below. Along our journey into antiquity we’ll explore the Acropolis with its treasures. We’ll admire the Parthenon, dedicated to the goddess Athena, and the Temple of Zeus. We’ll see remarkable displays of an ancient world during the visit to the Acropolis Museum, containing antiquities giving visitors insight into the lives of Athenians centuries ago

Cape Sounion in the Afternoon
Daily 15:00 – 19:15
Drive along the scenic coastal road past the beach resorts to the most southern point of Attica to Cape Sounion where the white marble pillars of the Temple of Poseidon stand. En-route there is an extraordinary view of the Saronic Gulf and the little islands offshore.

Athens By Night
Every Tue., Wed., Thu. & Sat 20:00 – Midnight
An evening drive past the illuminated Acropolis and stop for a drink at a nearby cafe to enjoy the view. Dinner at a typical Athenian taverna with bouzouki music and Greek folk dancing.

Ancient Corinth
April -October on Mon. & Fri 08:15 – 14:00
Drive south to the Corinth Canal that connects Aegean and Ionian Seas. Visit the ancient town of Corinth where St. Paul lived and preached for almost two years. The remains of the city which include the Agora and the Temple of Apollo (6th c. B.C.) clearly show how rich and important Corinth was in ancient times. With the professional tour guide you will explore an ancient city that several empires fought over throughout the centuries. Before returning to Athens stop at the site of the ancient port Kechries where St. Paul disembarked.

One day Tour to Delphi (with / without lunch)
Daily 08:30 – 18:30
Home of the Sanctuary of Apollo, Delphi is the most famous site in Classical Greece. On the slopes of Mount Parnassus, hear thee myths about the oracle and tour the excavations. Walk the Sacred Way to the 4th century Temple of Apollo and view the statues immortalising the strength of the athletes who once competed in the Pythian Games held in honour of Apollo and the Arts. A visit to the museum to admire the bronze Charioteer is included.

Full Day Tour to Argolis (with / without lunch)
Every Mon, Tue., Wed., Thu., Sat.08:00 – 18:30
After a short stop on the bridge crossing the Corinth Canal continue to Mycenae where 19th century excavations described by Homer can be seen. Visit the Beehive Tomb and the Lion’s Gate – Europe’s oldest known monument. On to Epidaurus via the port town of Nauplion to see the 2,000 year old amphitheatre known for its perfect acoustics.

One Day Saronic Island Cruise (with lunch)
Daily 08:00 a.m. – 20:00
Pick up from Athens center and transfer to the port for embarkation. Visit the beautiful islands of the Saronic Gulf; Aegina, Hydra and Poros.

Two Day Tour to Delphi
Daily
Day 1 – Depart Athens driving through the towns of Thebes and Levadia and the quaint village of Arachova, famous for its colourful carpets, to Delphi. Visit the Sanctuary of Apollo situated on the slopes of Mt. Parnassus, the Treasury of the Athenians, the Temple of Apollo and the museum containing the ancient Greek bronze sculpture “the Charioteer” and many other masterpieces. Dinner and overnight in Delphi.

Day 2 – Breakfast at the hotel. Morning at leisure in Delphi. Enjoy the scenery, return to the museum. Afternoon departure for Athens.

Two Day Tour to Argolis
April – October on Tue. & Wed.
Day 1 – After short stop at the bridge crossing the Corinth Canal continue to Mycenae where 19th century excavations described by Homer can be seen. Visit the Beehive Tomb and the Lion’s Gate – Europe’s oldest known monument. Continue to the lovely port town of Nafplion. Afternoon at leisure. Dinner and overnight in Nauplion.
Day 2 – Breakfast at hotel and morning at leisure in Nafplion. Depart for Epidaurus to visit the 4th century B.C. theatre famous for its perfect acoustics. Return to Athens early this evening.

Three Day Delphi & Meteora Tour
April – October on Tue., Wed. & Sun.
Day 1 – Depart Athens driving through the towns of Thebes and Levadia to Delphi. Visit the Sanctuary of Apollo situated on the slopes of Mt. Parnassus, the Treasury of the Athenians, the Temple of Apollo and the museum. Overnight in Delphi.
Day 2 – After breakfast, depart Delphi and enjoy an interesting drive through Central Greece, Thermopylae, famous for the heroic defence by Leonidas and his brave 300 Spartans against the invading Persians. (short stop) and the town of Lamia before reaching Kalambaka. Overnight in Kalambaka.
Day 3 – The breathtaking UNESCO World Heritage monasteries of Meteora are our first stop today. Following breakfast set out for Meteora to visit the ageless monasteries containing priceless historical and religious treasures, which appear to be suspended in air on top of huge granite rocks. With the professional tour guide visit two of the six Eastern Orthodox monasteries that cling impressively to immense, rounded rock towers overlooking the town. Return to Athens via the towns of Trikala, Lamia.

Three Day Classical Tour
April – October on Mon., Tue., Thu & Sat.
Day 1 – Drive South on the coastal road to Corinth Canal. Continue to Epidaurus to visit the theatre with its perfect acoustics and proceed to Mycenae to see the Lions’ Gate and Beehive Tomb. O/n Olympia.
Day 2 – This morning visit the Sanctuary of the Olympian Zeus and the museum. Drive to Delphi for o/n.
Day 3 – Walk on the sacred way and visit the Castalia Spring, the Sanctuary of Apollo and the museum. Return to Athens stopping at the picturesque village of Arachova.

Four Day Classical Tour (with Meteora)
April – October on Mon., Tue. Thu & Sat.
Day 1 – Drive via the coastal road stopping at the Corinth Canal and on to Epidaurus to visit the amphitheatre with its perfect acoustics and proceed to Mycenae to see the Lions Gate and Beehive Tomb. Overnight at Olympia.
Day 2 – This morning visit the site of the first Olympic Games; the Sanctuary of the Olympian Zeus and the museum. Drive on to Delphi for overnight.
Day 3 – After the visit at the Sanctuary of Apollo and the museum, depart for Kalambaka passing through numerous picturesque villages and typical towns of Central Greece and a short stop in Thermopylae. Overnight in Kalambaka.
Day 4 – Visit Meteora this morning and among striking scenery, perched on top of huge rocks which seem to be suspended in mid-air, stand ageless monasteries where there are exquisite specimens of Byzantine art. Return to Athens via Trikala, Lamia.

Peloponnese map

Visit Mycenae and the island of Poros in one (1) day!

You have the opportunity to visiGreek island of Poros.t in one day the 3500 years old ruins of the Mycenean civilization and combine it with the picturesque island of Poros.

Between May to September the tour operates every Wednesday and Friday
Departs at 08:30 and returns at +/-19:30

– Short photo stop at Corinth Canal.
– Continue to Mycenae, the Homeric City of Atreides.
– At Mycenae, walk through the Lions’ Gate, see the Cyclopean Walls, and the Royal Tombs.
– Finish with your sightseeing and drive to Galatas, take the small boat, and cross over to the island of Poros.
– On Poros, free time to stroll around the quay side or have lunch at a seaside Greek traditional tavern.
– Departure for the return to Athens, early afternoon.

PRICES: All travel agents, in Greece and worldwide, offer the same tour at different prices. We are sure that our prices for this tour is not matched by any other company. After 60 years organizing tours throughout Greece we have secured the best deals in all aspects of travel. So, why pay more?
Our discounted prices, per adult, for this tour are:

73.00 € With lunch, or 66.00 € without lunch

Prices Include
-Ferry boat from Galatas to Poros
-Transportation by modern air-conditioned coach
-Pick-up service from your hotel or near it (see the list of hotels in the footer)
-Lunch in Poros (optional)
-Taxes and V.A.T.

Meteora by train

In our tour you plan and organize everything yourself. You choose what monasteries to visit and how long to stay in each one.

Question: Is it possible to visit Meteora, see the monasteries, and return to Athens all in one day? The answer is: A lot depends on what you want to get out of the visit. In Kalambaka you have 3 hours to drive quickly on the rocks and visit 2-3 monasteries at the maximum. We shall do whatever you decide.

If your visit to Greece is too short, this is your chance to visit Meteora.

Visit Meteora and realize why the first hermits chose this location to create their monastic community and seek to communicate with God. See the 4 monasteries and the 2 nunneries, and visit two of them. Learn about the everyday life of the monks, admire their architecture and gaze at the priceless relics and treasures of the monasteries, a cultural heritage to all Christian religions.

When you finish with your sightseeing return to Kalambaka, have a light lunch, and board the train for your return to Athens. Arrive in Athens at 22:45

Itinerary


* You collect your tickets from us and settle the account, at least a day before departure.
* Be at the LARISA railway station in Athens at least 30 minutes before the train departure.
* Find platform 8. Your train comes at 08:10 am. The difficult thing is to find your coach and seat.
* 08:20 – The train departs and following a scenic route it travels straight from Athens to Kalampaka(last stop).
* 13:30 – Arrive in Kalampaka and meet our English speaking driver outside the railway station.
* 13:45 – Drive to Meteora. Visit up to 3 monasteries. See old hermitages and cloisters in the caves.
CLICK here and see the monasteries that are open on your day, and make your plan.
* 16:45 – Return to Kalampaka. Stop at a local restaurant for a light meal (not included in the price).
* 17:30 – The train departs from Kalampaka and arrives in Athens (LARISA station) at +/- 22.45.

Price


The price for the 3.30 hours private tour of Meteora includes your return B class train ticket and the taxi hire from the momntthatyou arrive until the moment that you tell the driver that you have seen enough and want to get back to kalambaka and have something to eat:

– 2 passengers: Train ticket (B class), 54.00 + 25.00 taxi hire = 79.00 € p.p.
– 3 passengers: Train ticket (B class), 54.00 + 20.00 taxi hire = 74.00 € p.p.
– 4 passengers: Train ticket (B class), 54.00 + 15.00 taxi hire = 69.00 € p.p.

Pay 54.00 € p.p. plus, the money for hiring the taxi, paid in cash to the driver in Kalampaka.

To secure your booking, please, read the terms and conditions, and, deposit 40.00 € p.p. in ….read more…

In our tour you are totally independent. You choose which monasteries to visit, how long to spend in every monastery visited, plus, you add a couple of stops to take photos, and have a light meal whenever you feel hungry.

Click and see our BEST SELLER 3 days/2 nights Meteora and Delphi, independent trip by train.

Price includes

– Return B class, train ticket. Pay 12.00 euro, and upgrade the train ticket to A class (recommended).
Upon arrival and for 3 hours, visit up to 3 monasteries & places that a foreigner does not visit.
Visit hidden beauties & explore the area with a local, English speaking driver.

NOT INCLUDED in the price:
* No professional tour guide service is included. It’s you and the taxi driver.
* 3.00 euro per person, being the entrance ticket to each monastery, and
* Your lunch and drinks in the train and while you are in Kalampaka.

Options to visit

CLICK here and see all the options to visit the area of Meteora

If you decide to spend more time in this unique area, there are packages organized for 2 or 3 days. During the extra day, join a Hiking Tour and explore the natural beauty, first hand. Follow the hiking guide and discover the trails that the first monks used centuries ago. Discover the geology of the region. Hiking down (always easier) on the well paved paths from the monastery of Grand Meteoron or the monastery of Varlaam all the way to the village of Kastraki and Kalambaka.

If you think that the hiking tour is a difficult exercise, join the 4 hour morning tour and learn more regarding the spirituality of Meteora. Discover their cultural wealth and have a personal experience of the second most important monastic community, after the Mount Athens, located in Chalkidiki, near Thessaloniki.

Last minute bookings are difficult to work out. Plan in advance and get the best seats in the train.

Testimonials


KSL13, Level 6 Contributor, TripAdvisor member since 2005, From USA
Kosta is an all service travel agent
I booked a tour to Meteora via train with Astoria travel at a significant discount from other agencies. Kosta also picked us up from the cruise port and took us to our Airbnb. He also gave us lots of advice about life in Greece. He knows so much! And he truly loves his job and he is proud of his country. I hope that lots of people use his services! I did not feel that he was exploiting tourist dollars, like most guys did. He is honest and reliable.
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Travelling to Meteora by train is the most comfortable and efficient way. A smooth and scenic ride.

Sparti: One of the two most powerful city-states in Classical Greece, Sparta is located in the Evrotas river valley, almost completely surrounded by mountain ranges. Unlike most of the other Greek city-states, Sparta was not a fortified city-state center with huge religious and civic buildings, but it was a loose collection of smaller villages spaced over a large rural area. Traditionally, Sparta’s founding is given at the middle of the 10th century B.C. by the Dorian Greeks. By the 7th century the warlike Spartans had conquered all of the surrounding Laconia and Messenia, and by the next century much of the remaining Peloponnese was under Spartan control. In the 5th century Sparta allied herself with Athens and other city-states in order to repulse the Persian aggressor, but soon after this the two city-states fell out, embarking on a century-long struggle for supremacy in the Peloponessian War, which ended with Spartan victory in 405 B.C. By the 4th century, however, Spartan power declined with its defeat by Thebes in 371 B.C., and, by 193 B.C., she had entirely lost her territorial possessions. Sparta thrived briefly under Roman Imperial rule, but was sacked by the Goths in 395 A.D and completely abandoned.
We will visit the archeaological remains of ancient Sparta, including the 2nd century BC theatre, the sites most discernible ruin (virtually nothing remains of the ancient city). The monuments on the site have not been restored yet but there are plans in the works for this under the auspices of the European Union. Important monuments of the site include the temple of Athena Chalkoikos on the top of the acropolis ; the ancient theatre, dating from the early Imperial period, the orchestra and walls of which still stand; a circular building of unknown use, which some scholars think was some kind of assembly; remains of shops, constructed in the Roman Imperial period, which served visitors to the theater; and finally, the remains of a Basilica of the Middle Byzantine period, dated to the 10th century A.D.
Mystras: Mystra enjoys one of the most beautiful situations in Greece, lying along a steep slope of Mt. Taygetos. At the top is the Kastro (fortified citadel), and on successive levels below are several Byzantine churches (most notably the Pantanassa), the Palace of the Despots, and everywhere spectacular views.
Few kilometers west to the Byzantine town Mystra on the slopes of Mt. Taygetos, an impregnable fortress, built by Guillame de Villehardouin in 1249. When the Byzantines won back the Morea from the Franks, Emperor Michael VIII Palaeologus made Mystra its capital and seat of government and Mystras became the leading city of the Peloponnese. It was governed by a Byzantine Despot, usually either a son or a brother of the Emperor in Constantinople.It soon became populated by people from the surrounding plains seeking refuge from invading Slavs. From this time, until the last despot, Demetrios, surrendered it to the Turks in 1460, a despot of Morea (usually a son or brother of the ruling Byzantine emperor) lived and reigned at Mystra. Mystra declined under Turkish rule. It was captured by the Venetians in 1687 and it thrived once again with a flourishing silk industry and a population of 40,000. It was recaptured by the Turks in 1715, and from then on it was downhill all the way. It was burned by the Russians in 1770, the Albanians in 1780 and Ibrahim Pasha in 1825. Not surprisingly, at the time of Independence it was in a very sorry state, virtually abandoned and in ruins. Since the 1950s much restoration work has taken place. Once inside Nafplion Gate, the tour will see the main sites of this ancient city such as the Palace of the Despots.

Kyparisia: about 40 miles southeast from Mystras, through some of the most striking and at times hair-raising scenery in Greece, to Kalamata, and from Kalamata it’s another 32 miles to Kyparissia. Kyparisia: In his “description of Greece” Pausanias describes Kyparissia in these words: “having come to Cyparissiae we see a spring below the city near the sea. They say that Dionysus made the water flow by smiting the earth with his wand; hence they name it the spring of Dionysus. There is also a sanctuary of Apollo at Kyparissae, and another of Athena surnamed Kyparissian…there is a temple of Aulonian Aesculapius and an image of him” (4.36) Today, the Spring of Dionysus can still be seen on the beach of Ai Lagoudia in Kyparissia, a town on the south-western Peloponnese, but of the temples little remains. In Byzantine times Kyparissia was called Arkadia because of the Arkadian people who came to live there. The Arkadians built a massive castle on the site of the old acropolis, which was later rebuilt by the Franks. The castle and the ancient harbor are the main monuments on Kyparissia today. However, the town is a popular summer getaway because of its attractive beaches and summer festivities.

Pylos: The home of Nestor, the “elder statesman” of the Greek warriors at Troy, Pylos is located on the hill of Epano Englianos, near Navarino Bay, the southwest coast of the Peloponneseus. Occupied as early as the Middle Bronze Age, the site is dominated by a monumental structure, known as Nestor’s palace, which is the best preserved of the existing Mycenean palaces. Built in the Late Bronze Age (ca.1300 B.C.), the palace consists of 105 ground floor apartments. The most important compartments of the palace are the the big “throne room”, with its circular heath, a room with a clay bath tube, and stores with numerous storage jars. The walls of the palace were decorated with beautiful frescos. Thousands of clay tablets in Linear B script were found in the palace. (The Linear B script has been found to be based on the Greek language and was deciphered by a British archaeologist, Michael Ventris, in the 1950s).The palace was destroyed by fire in the 12th century B.C., and by a happy accident of chance, the linear B tablets were preserved by baking in the fire.
Spending the day in and around Pylos, visiting the Venetian castle at Methoni, the Mycenean palace at Pylos (called the Palace of Nestor, the garrulous old advisor in the Iliad), and the Pylos Museum. The Palace of Nestor was first excavated by Carl Blegen of Cincinnati in 1952 and was destroyed by fire at the end of the Mycenean period (around 1200 BC). It is quite a bit smaller than Mycenae, and it is here that the first Linear B tablets found on the Greek mainland were discovered in 1939.

Archaeological Site of Kolona aegina

Spend a day on Aegina

Visit Aegina, capital of Greece (1827-1829), on a day trip from Piraeus. Take the morning ferry from Piraeus and in 1h 20m. arrive in Aegina. The church of Agios Nikolaos, at the port of the island, welcomes you. The beautiful neoclassical buildings remind you of the glory of the island.

Proved by findings in the Column area, dating from 3000 BC. Aegina was inhabited since the Neolithic time. Later Minoans came to the island, then – Achaeans and Dorians. From the middle of the 1st c. BC Aegina developed rush trade and at the same time declares itself as a powerful maritime state. The peak of blossom comes in 6th c. BC, when Aegina, being independent, became the first city-state, and began to mint coins. Despite the concurrence with Athens and Piraeus, Aegina became confederate of Athens in the Salamis battle. However Athenians (who never really trusted Aegina) took over the island in the 5th c. BC. The latest history of the island does not stand out from the history of the rest of Greece. The participation of the island in the liberation war against the Turks in 1821 was of major importance, because Aegina was the first seat of the first government of independent Greece led by Kapodistrias.
Sightseeings in the town: the Archeological museum, the Column (close to the port area) which is actually the only remnant of the Temple of Apollo, the cathedral, in which the first Greek government swore.
You can take a tour to the famous temple of Goddess Aphaea, the patroness of the island, located 11 km from the town. A doric temple, built after the battle of Salamis, in 480 BC.
Another tour is to the monastery of St.Nektarios. The new built temple of the monastery is one of the best samples of the neo-byzantine architecture in Greece. The monastery of St.Nektarios is located on a hill not far from the port of island. Here, in a little church, is preserved the st. Chapter of Prelate. You visit the cell, where he was praying during the last years of his life and drink healing water from the holy fountain.

What can you do in Aegina

Visit the Archaeological Site of Kolona.

Archaeological Site of Kolona aegina

Archaeological Site of Kolona aegina

The Hill of kolona was inhabited in prehistoric times through the classical period. Extensive walls and foundations have been discovered and excavations are still in progress. One single column is still standing, the only remaining from the Temple of Apollo built in the 6th c. BC.,

 

The small Museum  (Tue-Sun 08:30-15:00), containing a small but rich collection of pottery and sculpture from all periods of Aegina’s history. One of the most significant exhibits is the statue of the Sphinx (460 BC), which was dedicated to the Temple of Apollo. It is an extraordinary sculpture, with a head of a woman and a body that is half eagle and half lion,

 

 The Doric temple of Aphaea

The Doric temple of Aphaea

The Doric temple of Aphaea that we see today in a very good condition, was built about 490 BC of local porous sandstone. It stands on top of a pine-clad hill above Agia Marina. The first temple on the site (700 BC) was dedicated to Aphaea, a deity from Crete. Aphaea was worshiped at this sanctuary but the myth can be traced back to the 14th c. BC. and according to Greek mythology she was a beautiful young lady, another illegitimate child of Zeus. King Minos of Crete had fallen in love with her. Trying to escape from him she jumped into the sea but was caught in the net of fishermen. They took her on their boat. A fisherman, captivated by her beauty, fell in love and wanted to keep her for himself. Aphaea escaped, got out in Aegina, and asked for help from her half sister, goddess Artemis. She vanished in the woods of the island. When the fishermen arrived on the spot, they found only a statue. “Aphaea” in Greek means ‘invisible.’
On a clear day, you can see the Temple of Poseidon at Sounio, as well as the Acropolis of Athens. These three temples form the sacred triangle of antiquity, an isosceles triangle, between North, East and South. (Open daily 08:00-17:00, Museum: Tues-Sun 08:30-14:15).\

 
The Church of Agios Nektarios (named after its patron).

The Church of Agios Nektarios aegina

The Church of Agios Nektarios aegina

St Nektarios, died in 1920 and was canonized in 1961.

His memory is celebrated on 9 November.

You may have lunch in a taverna at the port, swim in a nice sandy beach and in the afternoon board the ferry back to Piraeus.